As we barrel along into 2018, it feels a fitting time to reflect on the big trend of 2017: the slogan T-shirt. The catwalks were packed with slogan tees and high street shops quickly realised that putting an empowering slogan on a tee guaranteed a speedy seller, especially if it was one with a feminist slant.

The Dress of the Year 2017 – and Images’ Decorated product of the month – is an outfit from Dior’s spring/summer 2017 collection that includes the white cotton ‘We Should All Be Feminists’ print T-shirt. Combined with a black wool jacket and black tulle skirt, it was a striking statement that garnered a huge amount of press and provided inspiration for the entire fashion industry.

The Dress of the Year 2017 was selected for the Fashion Museum Bath by Sarah Bailey of Red Magazine. Speaking of the appointment of Maria Grazia Chiuri as creative director at Christian Dior, she commented: “When I saw her first collection come down the runway it was utterly uncompromising in its message. I loved the resolute strength of the models in their logo T-shirts emblazoned with Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s call to arms ‘We Should All Be Feminists’.”

Maria Grazia Chiuri said: “I think a T-shirt, because it is so basic, is the easiest way to display your ideas. The slogan ‘We Should All Be Feminists’ takes over this blank space and plays with the political value of appearances. I’m glad that so many women saw my T-shirt as a way to claim their own position, their own role in society, to make their voice heard through this item of clothing. It’s quite an awakening also for fashion, and for what you can do with fashion. For me, the white T-shirt was a simple, direct and immediate means to say something loud and clear.”

The Dress of the Year 2017 will be on display at the Fashion Museum until 1 January 2019.

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If you would like to nominate a garment for decorated product of the month – your own or another designer’s – email us at editorial@images-magazine.com, putting ‘Decorated product of the month’ as the subject.